The National Center for Evidence-Based Practice
in Communication Disorders
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Aphasia
Assessment

Screening for Aphasia

 


 

External Scientific Evidence

  

Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines

Royal College of Physicians; Stroke Association; Broehringer Ingelheim; Merck Sharp & Dohme; Sanofi-Sythelapo & Bristol-Myers Squibb
 
National Clinical Guidelines for Stroke
Intercollegiate Stroke Working Party (2008).
London (United Kingdom): Royal College of Physicians, 3rd Edition, 187 pages
.
 
Added: May 2012
 
Description
This guideline provides recommendations for the management of stroke across all populations. The audiences intended for this guideline include clinical staff, managers, commissioners involved in the purchasing of services, patients with stroke and their caregivers. Of particular interest to speech-language pathologists is a section on the management of swallowing and communication disorders. Specific recommendations were made based on the nature and strength of the evidence using a formal consensus approach by the guideline working group
 
Recommendations
Patients with left hemisphere damage should be screened for aphasia
 
 
 
 
Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing
 
Clinical Guidelines for Acute Stroke Management 2010
National Stroke Foundation (2010).
Melbourne (Australia): National Stroke Foundation, 167 pages
Added: May 2012 
 
Description

This guideline provides recommendations for the assessment and management of stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) in adults. These guidelines are primarily intended to assist health care workers in improving quality and effectiveness of service. Of particular interest to speech-language pathologists is chapter six which focuses on rehabilitation management for aphasia, dysphagia, dysarthria, apraxia and cognitive-communication deficits. Recommendations are graded A, B, C, D or "Good Practice Point" based on the following criteria: 

  • Grade A: Evidence can be trusted to guide practice.
  • Grade B: Evidence can be used to guide practice in most situations.
  • Grade C: Evidence provides some support, but care should be taken in application.
  • Grade D: Evidence is weak and should be applied cautiously.
  • Good Practice Point: Evidence based on clinical experience and expert opinion 
Recommendations
All patients with suspected aphasia should be screened for communication deficits using a valid and reliable screening tool (Grade C Evidence)
 
 
 
 
New Zealand Ministry of Health
 
New Zealand Clinical Guidelines for Stroke Management 2010
Stroke Foundation of New Zealand and New Zealand Guidelines Group (2010).
Wellington (New Zealand): Stroke Foundation of New Zealand, 347 pages
Added: May 2012 
 
Description

This guideline provides recommendations for the management of individuals recovering from stroke and transient ischemic attacks. The target audience of the guideline is all healthcare professionals providing services to persons with stroke and their family in the New Zealand context. Of particular interest to speech-language pathologists are the sections discussing communication (aphasia, apraxia, dysarthria), cognition and swallowing disorders. Levels of evidence recommendations are graded as A, B, C, D or "Good Practice Points" and defined as follows: 

  • Level A: Body of evidence can be trusted to guide practice.
  • Level B: Body of evidence can be trusted to guide practice in most situations.
  • Level C: Body of evidence provides some support for recommendation(s) but care should be taken in its application.
  • Level D: Body of evidence is weak and recommendation must be applied with caution.
  • Good Practice Point: Recommended best practice based on clinical experience and expert opinion
Recommendations
All patients with suspected aphasia should be screened for communication deficits using a valid and reliable screening tool (Level C Evidence)
 
 
 
 
 

Evidence-Based Systematic Reviews

No evidence-based systematic reviews were found.
 
 

Clinical Expertise/Expert Opinion

 
Consensus Guidelines  
No consensus guidelines were found. 
 
 
 
 

Client/Patient/Caregiver Perspectives

 
No information was found pertaining to client/patient/caregiver perspectives.
 
 
 
Use the image below to navigate to other sections of the Aphasia evidence map.