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Summary of Clinical Practice Guideline

National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Diagnosis and Management of ADHD in Children, Young People and Adults
National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. (2009).
London (UK): The British Psychological Society and The Royal College of Psychiatrists, No. CG72.

AGREE Rating: Highly Recommended

Description:
This guideline provides recommendations for the diagnosis and management of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, adolescents, and adults. The guideline is intended for clinicians and service commissioners.

Recommendations:

Social Communication Disorders

  • Treatment

    • Cognition/Language

      • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

        • “When using group treatment ([cognitive behavioral therapy] CBT and/or social skills training) for the [school-aged] child or young person in conjunction with a parent-training/education programme, particular emphasis should be given to targeting a range of areas, including social skills with peers, problem solving, self-control, listening skills and dealing with and expressing feelings. Active learning strategies should be used, and rewards given for achieving key elements of learning” (p. 205).

      • Parent-Mediated/Implemented

        • "If the [school-aged] child or young person with ADHD has moderate levels of impairment, the parents or carers should be offered referral to a group parent training/education programme, either on its own or together with a group treatment programme ([cognitive behavioral therapy] CBT and/or social skills training) for the child or young person” (p. 205).

        • “When using group treatment (CBT and/or social skills training) for the [school-aged] child or young person in conjunction with a parent-training/education programme, particular emphasis should be given to targeting a range of areas, including social skills with peers, problem solving, self-control, listening skills and dealing with and expressing feelings. Active learning strategies should be used, and rewards given for achieving key elements of learning” (p. 205).

        • “For older adolescents with ADHD and moderate impairment, individual psychological interventions (such as CBT or social skills training) may be considered as they may be more effective and acceptable than group parent training/education programmes or group CBT and/or social skills training” (p. 205).

      • Pragmatic/Social Skills Treatment

        • General Findings

          • ”Positive effects of psychological interventions on core ADHD symptoms together with ratings of conduct, social skills or self-efficacy were found. The interventions studied were either mixed [cognitive behavioral therapy] CBT/social skills interventions delivered to groups or predominantly CBT interventions” (p. 172).

          • "If the [school-aged] child or young person with ADHD has moderate levels of impairment, the parents or carers should be offered referral to a group parent training/education programme, either on its own or together with a group treatment programme (CBT and/or social skills training) for the child or young person” (p. 205).

          • “When using group treatment (CBT and/or social skills training) for the [school-aged] child or young person in conjunction with a parent-training/education programme, particular emphasis should be given to targeting a range of areas, including social skills with peers, problem solving, self-control, listening skills and dealing with and expressing feelings. Active learning strategies should be used, and rewards given for achieving key elements of learning” (p. 205).

          • ”For older adolescents with ADHD and moderate impairment, individual psychological interventions (such as CBT or social skills training) may be considered as they may be more effective and acceptable than group parent training/education programmes or group CBT and/or social skills training” (p. 205).

  • Service Delivery

    • Format

      • “Positive effects of psychological interventions on core ADHD symptoms together with ratings of conduct, social skills or self-efficacy were found. The interventions studied were either mixed [cognitive behavioral therapy] CBT/social skills interventions delivered to groups or predominantly CBT interventions”  (p. 172).

      • "If the [school-aged] child or young person with ADHD has moderate levels of impairment, the parents or carers should be offered referral to a group parent training/education programme, either on its own or together with a group treatment programme (CBT and/or social skills training) for the child or young person” (p. 205).

      • “When using group treatment (CBT and/or social skills training) for the [school-aged] child or young person in conjunction with a parent-training/education programme, particular emphasis should be given to targeting a range of areas, including social skills with peers, problem solving, self-control, listening skills and dealing with and expressing feelings. Active learning strategies should be used, and rewards given for achieving key elements of learning” (p. 205).

      • “For older adolescents with ADHD and moderate impairment, individual psychological interventions (such as CBT or social skills training) may be considered as they may be more effective and acceptable than group parent training/education programmes or group CBT and/or social skills training” (p. 205).

Keywords:
ADHD

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