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in Communication Disorders
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Pediatric Dysphagia Evidence Map
Treatment

Sensory Stimulation

 



 

External Scientific Evidence

  

Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines

No evidence-based practice guidelines were found.


Evidence-Based Systematic Reviews
Evidence-Based Intervention for Toddlers with Sensorimotor Feeding Disorders
Redle, E. E. (2012).
EBP Briefs, 7(4), 1-13.
Added: April 2013

Description
This is a systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature investigating oral sensorimotor interventions in toddlers with feeding delays.

Conclusions
The author concluded that direct comparisons of the two interventions (i.e., oral motor alone versus a combination of sensory and oral motor treatment) was difficult given that the treatments examined in the included empirical studies had both a sensory and motor component. Currently, better evidence is available for treatments combining oral motor and sensory interventions in this specific population. 

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Interventions for Drooling in Children with Cerebral Palsy
Walshe, M., Smith, M., et al. (2012).
Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2, CD008624.

This review meets the criteria for a high-quality evidence-based systematic review.
Added: April 2013

Description
This is a systematic review of randomized controlled trials examining various interventions for drooling in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Treatments investigated in the review include: surgery, pharmacological interventions, botulin toxin, oro-motor/oro-sensory therapies, behavioral interventions, intra-oral appliances, and acupuncture.

Conclusions
No studies were found on surgery, physical/oro-motor-oro-sensory therapies, behavioral treatments, intra-oral appliances, or acupuncture. "There is insufficient evidence to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of interventions aimed at reducing or eliminating drooling in children with cerebral palsy or to provide the best available evidence to inform clinical practice" (p. 30).

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Clinical Expertise/Expert Opinion

 
Consensus Guidelines  
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
 
Roles and Responsibilities of Speech-Language Pathologists in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Guidelines
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2005).
Retrieved from: http://www.asha.org/docs/html/GL2005-00060.html
 
Added: July 2011
 
Description
This is a guideline providing recommendations on the roles and responsibilities of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) providing care in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Recommendations are provided pertaining to assessment and management of communication, feeding, and swallowing of infants. 
 
Recommendations
  • Kangaroo mother care (KMC) (skin-to-skin contact between a mother and her newborn infant) and nonnutritive sucking (NNS) may be important factors in the achievement of readiness for oral feeding.
  • KMC was demonstrated to have a positive effect in one randomized controlled trial of over 400 infants; however, one review suggests that there is insufficient evidence to support the routine use of KMC in low birth weight infants.
  • Several studies have shown positive outcomes and cost-effectiveness associated with NNS. Findings from other studies support use of auditory, tactile, visual, and vestibular, oral and facial stimulation which appear to improve initial alertness.

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American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
 
Roles of Speech-Language Pathologists in Swallowing and Feeding Disorders: Technical Report
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2001).
Retrieved from: http://www.asha.org/docs/html/TR2001-00150.html.
 
 
Added: July 2011
 
Description
This ASHA position statement provides information regarding the role of the SLP in evaluation and management of children and adults with feeding and swallowing disorders and discusses the scope and rationale for SLP services. 
 
Recommendations
“Sensory input may need to be heightened for some children; those who demonstrate aversive responses to stimulation may need approaches that reduce the level of sensory input initially, with incremental increases as the child indicates tolerance” (p. 16). 
 
 
 
 

Client/Patient/Caregiver Perspectives

 
No information was found pertaining to client/patient/caregiver perspectives.
 
 
 




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