The National Center for Evidence-Based Practice
in Communication Disorders
Home      Review-206

Summary of Systematic Review

Feeding Interventions for Growth and Development in Infants with Cleft Lip, Cleft Palate or Cleft Lip and Palate
Bessell, A., Hooper, L. et al. (2011).
Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2).

This review meets the criteria for a high-quality evidence-based systematic review.

Indicators of Review Quality:

The review states a clearly focused question or aim Yes
Criteria for inclusion of studies are provided Yes
Search strategy is described in sufficient detail for replication Yes
Included studies are assessed for study quality Yes
Quality assessments are reproducible Yes
Characteristics of the included studies are provided Yes

Description:
This is a review of randomized controlled trials investigating the effects of feeding interventions on growth, development and parent satisfaction for infants with cleft lip and palate.

Question(s)/Aim(s) Addressed:
What are the differential effects of feeding interventions for infants born with cleft lip and/or cleft palate?

Population:
Infants born with cleft lip or palate up to the age of 6 months.

Intervention/Assessment:
Interventions for infants born with cleft lip/palate including modified bottles, cups, spoons, pumps, positions, techniques, teats, obturating plates, or maternal advice/support.

Number of Studies Included:
5

Years Included:
Through 2010

Conclusions:

Cleft Lip and Palate

  • Treatment

    • Swallowing/Feeding

      • General Findings

        • Five studies were included which examined various feeding interventions. While there is no evidence to support or refute the type of bottle for best growth outcomes, the authors indicated that squeezable bottles may be easier to use than rigid ones as feeding intervention for infants with cleft lip and/or palate.

        • No evidence was found to support the use of maxillary plates for infants with a unilateral cleft palate.

        • No evidence was found to assess the effects of maternal advice or support.

Pediatric Dysphagia

  • Treatment

    • General Findings

      • "This review found some evidence that breastfeeding, when compared to spoon-feeding, may improve weight gain in babies following surgery for cleft lip" for up to 6-weeks post-surgery (p. 12).

      • No evidence was found to assess the effects of maternal advice or support.

    • Equiupment/Utensils

      • Five studies were included which examined various feeding interventions. While there is no evidence to support or refute the type of bottle for best growth outcomes, the authors indicated that squeezable bottles may be easier to use than rigid ones as feeding intervention for infants with cleft lip and/or palate.

      • "This review found some evidence that breastfeeding, when compared to spoon-feeding, may improve weight gain in babies following surgery for cleft lip" for up to 6-weeks post-surgery (p. 12).

    • Prosthetic

      • No evidence was found to support the use of maxillary plates for infants with a unilateral cleft palate.

      • Patient Perspective:

        • Five studies were included which examined various feeding interventions. However, no findings related to parental satisfaction included.

        • Further research is warranted.

Sponsoring Body:
The Cochrane Collaboration; University Dental Hospital of Manchester (UK)

Keywords:
Craniofacial Disorders

» Access the Review